Tag Archives: visualization

Event tip: Dutch Information Visualization Event 2016

Dutch Information Visualization Event 2016

Quick event tip: are you based in the Netherlands and interested in (tool agnostic) Data Visualization? If so, check out the Dutch Information Visualization Event (DIVE 2016) on June 23rd in Utrecht. More information (in Dutch) can be found here.

Geographical analysis with QlikMaps

QlikMaps

There are multiple mapping extensions available for geographical visualization and analysis in QlikView and Qlik Sense. Examples of commercial offerings are GeoQlik, NPGeoMap, Idevio and QlikMaps. Bitmetric (the people behind this blog 😉 ) is a QlikMaps partner, so I have been working a lot with QlikMaps recently. I have found it very powerful yet easy to work with.

QlikMaps demo

Today I want to share with you a small demo that I built. This demo shows demographic information about London mixed with a few of my holiday snapshots. The demo shows most of the common features of QlikMaps.

Want to try QlikMaps?

QlikMaps is available for both QlikView and Qlik Sense. Want to get a free trial and try it out with your own data? Then send us a request using the form below and we’ll get you hooked up!

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Have QlikView – Will Travel. Where do Masters Summit attendees come from?

Advanced QlikView Training: theMasters Summit for QlikViewIf you are a regular reader of this blog, you are probably aware of the Masters Summit for QlikView. Besides offering some of the best advanced QlikView training available on the market, this 3 day event adds a unique “conference feel” where you are able to network and exchange ideas with peers from all around the world.

My colleague Frédérique recently put together some visualizations to answer some questions we had about our attendees; where do our attendees come from? How far do they travel? What kind of companies do they work for? Do they and their companies experience enough value to return?

As I thought you might enjoy these visualizations as well I have posted them to the blog. If you want to hear more about our attendees’ experiencing, be sure to also check out the testimonials page over on the Masters Summit website.

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Visual FX in QlikView (5): Merry Xmas 2014!

Christmas time is near again, so it’s time for another visual effect in QlikView: the QlikFix 2014 Christmas Card. Using the trusty animated scatter plot once more, I’ve built a little spinning Christmas tree (and, in the spirit of Christmas, added some awful music 😉 ). Check the video below:

The complete QVW can be downloaded below:

Download the 2014 QlikFix Christmas Card

Wishing you all happy holidays and all the best for 2015!

More visual FX in QlikView:

 

Building a nicer (dynamic) multibox, without extensions

Building a nicer, dynamic multibox in QlikViewThe multibox is a QlikView object that I find extremely useful because it allows you to fit selection fields into a much smaller space. At the same time, I also find it extremely annoying; the gradient looks dated and if you want your field names and values to be readable you will often have to make both columns quite wide. For these reasons I tend to not use the multibox in my applications, using a conditionally hidden drop-down filter panel instead.

Recently, I was hired to perform a health check on an application. The application made extensive use of a multibox (in a very nice and flexible way, I should add). One of the challenges my client was facing was that not every field was relevant to every user. Besides a general technical review of the application, the developers wanted to know if it was possible to create a dynamic multibox. A multibox where users could select which fields they want to show.

As I started digging in to this question, I realized there’s a much nicer way to create a multibox. After experimenting with it for a bit, I actually like this solution so much that I will probably be using it in some of my future projects.

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Scripts and wizards, too much script, not enough wizards

ScriptVsWizardsI recently read an interesting post by James Richardson over at the Business Discovery Blog: Wizards vs Scripts. In the post James makes the case that QlikView scripting is not old-fashioned or too hard, but is evidence of the power of QlikView as a platform.

Let me first state that I love QlikView scripting. I’m a guy who writes script for fun. I also agree that scripting offers much more flexibility than a visual solution ever could. With those things in mind, I would like to present a different viewpoint: I think that QlikView places too much emphasis on scripting. In my opinion, the default approach should be much more visual.

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Masters Summit for QlikView: European Edition

Masters Summit for QlikViewAfter the success of the Las Vegas edition last April, I’m excited to be once again presenting alongside Rob Wunderlich, Bill Lay and Oleg Troyansky at the European edition of the Masters Summit for QlikView.

Masters Summit for QlikView; London and BarcelonaComing to London from October 9  to 11 and to Barcelona from 14 to 16 October, the Masters Summit brings you 3 days of hands on sessions where we will discuss advanced techniques in building complex solutions with QlikView. The goal of this event is to take your QlikView skills to the next level and help you become a QlikView  master.

For the early birds, there is an attractive discount of US$ 300 (around 225 Euro’s) until August 16th, which, for example, should be enough to cover air fare from most locations within Europe. Make sure you do not miss out on this great offer and:

Register for the Masters Summit for QlikView

I hope to see you all there!

Masters Summit for QlikView

Masters Summit for QlikView, April 16 - 18, Four Seasons, Las VegasI’m proud to be one of the speakers at the Masters Summit for QlikView, which will be held at the Four Seasons in Las Vegas on April 16 – 18.

In 3 days of hands-on sessions, Rob Wunderlich, Bill Lay, Oleg Troyansky and I hope to provide you with new knowledge and skills that will take your QlikView experience to the next level. We’ll be covering topics around advanced scripting, data modeling, expressions, visualization and much more. Besides an opportunity to invest in new knowledge and skills, this is also an excellent opportunity to network and exchange new ideas with your peers.

I hope you will be able to join us there. For more information, see the conference website.

Visual FX in QlikView (4): Season’s greetings!

Christmas time is coming near and I’m in a festive mood, so today I have a short post to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Of course, it wouldn’t be a QlikFix Christmas if I hadn’t whipped up a little visual effect in QlikView. Without further ado, here is my QlikView Christmas card to you:

But wait, there’s more! Inspired by the Christmas theme over at Matt Fryer’s QlikView Addict blog (a recommended read, by the way), I decided to create a small document extension that lets you add a little Christmas spirit to your own QlikView documents. Amaze (or annoy) your clients, co-workers and users! For example, how about adding a little snow to the golf course?
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Prebuilt QlikView Script for Mozilla’s Open Data Visualization Contest

Mozilla Test PilotA few days ago I became aware of the Mozilla Open Data Visualization Contest that is being organized by Mozilla Labs and the Mozilla Metrics Team. The goal of this contest is to creatively visualize answers to the question “How do people use Firefox?”. For example by creating visualizations that investigate interesting usage patterns, reveal interesting user behavior, or explore browser performance.

I figured this would be a nice challenge, so I decided to download the data and load it into QlikView. Since I am always curious to see what other people can do with QlikView (it can be very educational) I have shared my load script and data cloud here, so that other developers interested in joining the competition can get a running start. read more »