Tag Archives: becauseitcanbedone

Visual FX in QlikView (5): Merry Xmas 2014!

Christmas time is near again, so it’s time for another visual effect in QlikView: the QlikFix 2014 Christmas Card. Using the trusty animated scatter plot once more, I’ve built a little spinning Christmas tree (and, in the spirit of Christmas, added some awful music ๐Ÿ˜‰ ). Check the video below:

The complete QVW can be downloaded below:

Download the 2014 QlikFix Christmas Card

Wishing you all happy holidays and all the best for 2015!

More visual FX in QlikView:

 

Visual FX in QlikView (4): Season’s greetings!

Christmas time is coming near and I’m in a festive mood, so today I have a short post to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Of course, it wouldn’t be a QlikFix Christmas if I hadn’t whipped up a little visual effect in QlikView. Without further ado, here is my QlikView Christmas card to you:

But wait, there’s more! Inspired by the Christmas theme over at Matt Fryer’s QlikView Addict blog (a recommended read, by the way), I decided to create a small document extension that lets you add a little Christmas spirit to your own QlikView documents. Amaze (or annoy) your clients, co-workers and users! For example, how about adding a little snow to the golf course?
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Visual FX in QlikView (3)

With so many people commenting positively on my previous two pointless-but-pretty visual effects in QlikView, I’ve decided to make it an irregularly recurring Friday-afternoon series. At least, until I run out of ideas or opportunities to build these applications.

This time I’ve created an animated fire effect using a scatter plot. Like the previous two effects it has absolutely no practical application, unless you’re pitching QlikView to Industrial Light & Magic ๐Ÿ˜‰ The video below demonstrates the effect.

 

If you want to try the application for yourself, you can download it by clicking the link below. Beware that the application is quite memory-hungry, you’ll need at least 4GB to run the app.

Download the QlikView Animated Fire app

Earlier posts in this series:

Visual FX in QlikView (2)

After the many enthusiastic responses to last week’s post on visual effects in QlikView, I’ve decided to post one more pretty-but-pointless animated chart before returning to the serious stuff. This time I’ve created a plasma effect using an animated scatter plot in QlikView. The video below demonstrates the application.


If you want to try out the application yourself, you can download the full application below.

Download the QlikView Animated Plasma app

That’s it for this time. The next post will have practical use again, I promise ๐Ÿ˜‰

Visual FX in QlikView

Today’s post comes to you straight from the Department of Useless-But-Fun Stuff.

Many people have seen Hans Rosling’s informative (and very entertaining) presentations in which he uses his Gapminder software to present data in animated scatter plots. With the Animate Dimension function, QlikView offers similar functionality to create animated charts.

Unfortunately, as many have discovered, animating charts in QlikView does not immediately make them informative or entertaining. In fact, the opposite is quite often the case; boring data is presented in an animated form and becomes even more tedious.

Curious to see if I could create an animated chart that, while maybe not informative, at least looks pretty, I decided to create a chart based on Lissajous curves. You can see the result, which uses a standard scatter plot, in the video below. The video contains cheesy music, so check the volume level before pressing play.


Of course, this chart lacks any practical application, but I find that it does look quite cool. Incidentally, this is also the only caseย  in which the use of shiny spheres in a scatter plot is permissible. Should you want to play around with the app, it can be downloaded below.

Download the QlikView Animated Lissajous Curve app

Excel and VBA: the poor man’s QlikView

Today I have something completely different for you. It is only tangentially related to QlikView and lacks any practical application for QlikView professionals, but I know it will make you smile when you see it.

A few years ago I was the technical lead on a project that required the development of multiple Excel dashboards. I designed and developed (together with Nico Wuite, who did a lot of the coding) an Excel plug-in that could be used to generate stand-alone, fully interactive Excel dashboards. I recently rediscovered the plugin after cleaning up my archive of Excel and VBA reference files and thought it would be fun to generate a demo dashboard.

Have a look at the embedded video below (preferably in full screen HD) and see if it reminds you of a certain BI tool ๐Ÿ˜‰ Also, keep in mind that this was built before PowerPivot was released, so it is a little dated by now.