Category Archives: General

General topics

Qlik named leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant

The 2017 Magic Quadrant for Business Intelligence and Analytics Platforms has been released and Qlik is in the Leaders quadrant for the 7th consecutive year! Besides Qlik, both Tableau and Microsoft return in the Leaders quadrant, where they also were last year.

 

Comparing this edition with previous year’s Magic Quadrant, we can see that Qlik has lost around 15% on Completeness of vision, while more or less keeping the same Ability to execute. At the same time, we can see that both Tableau and Microsoft have both significantly improved their lead in these areas. I haven’t seen the actual analyst report yet so the reasons for these changes remain speculation at this time.  (will update with a link once a vendor releases it for free).

Update 2017/02/22: the full report can be found here.

 

 

Looking at the multi-year trend, we can see that Business Discovery has truly become mainstream while the previously dominant ‘Mega Vendors’ have been downgraded to the middle of the pack (look where IBM was in 2013, and where it is now). The positive exception here is Microsoft, which seems to have reinvented themselves in the past few year (Power BI!).

 

Look who’s talking to your Qlik Sense Desktop

lookwhostalkingHappy new year to you! Just a very short post today with a little fun and possibly a warning. You may be aware that you can use the Qlik Sense API’s on your Qlik Sense Desktop, but are you also aware that any webpage can access them? The widget on the top right contains some JavaScript that tries to connect to your local Qlik Sense Desktop, if it succeeds the version and number of apps are displayed. (click on the X Applications link for an application browser)

This is just some harmless fun of course, and potentially offers some nice options for Qlik bloggers, for example click to automatically generate an app, online performance analyzer, etc. Just be aware that there could also be more nefarious purposes, for example deleting applications or extracting data. It’s probably very unlikely that someone will target this, but good to keep in mind anyway.

On a different note, Qlik Sense 3.1 SR4 was released yesterday. And, if you’re based in The Netherlands (or willing to travel there) and interested in Qlik Sense web development with mashups, extensions and widgets then we have an interesting training coming up. More info here (in Dutch, but training will be in English, contact me if you’re interested).

Extracting embedded images from QlikView

ImageExtractor for QlikView

ImageExtractor for QlikView

ImageExtractor is a small utility that extracts images from your QlikView applications and stores them as bitmaps. It also gives you a browser that tells you which images are used in which QlikView application.

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Remote include scripts

Got a bunch of scripts here for you, where do you want me to put them?One of the reasons why I like QlikView so much is that there are always new functions and applications to discover. Yesterday I was at a client who is a Qlik OEM partner. During lunch we discussed various uses of include scripts. The question came up if it was possible to remotely update include scripts. At the same time they didn’t want these external scripts to be viewable (they sell a solution based on QlikView, clients get the solution but the OEM owns the code). Of course, that makes things a little more complicated. The include script sits outside of QlikView in plain text, so anyone can read it. Besides that, updating an external script that sits on the client’s local server is also not a straightforward affair.

I started wondering if it might be possible to fetch an include script from a remote website. So I just tried it, and it works!* (in QlikView, Sense requires Legacy Mode to be enabled, I will let you decide if that is a good idea)

Try this one for example:

$(must_include=http://www.qlikfix.com/remote_include/?license=12345);

In my opinion, this opens up some interesting use cases:

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QlikView macro’s are bad!

Last Thursday I did a presentation at the Qlik Dev Group NL about QlikView macro’s. While the title Macro’s are bad! suggests that I have a very firm view on macro’s, of course the actual presentation is much more nuanced. I wouldn’t be talking about macro’s if I didn’t think they have their uses 😉

In my presentation, I identify some potential use cases for macro’s and discuss if these are a good idea. Next, I share some tips on developing and debugging your macro’s. There are a lot of myths around macro’s, so I have taken a look at which ones are actually true. The presentation concludes with an overview of some of the cool macro’s that are already out there.

You can find my slide deck below:

The examples that I used in my presentation can be downloaded using the link below:

Download the macro examples

I hope you will enjoy these slides. If you have any questions or, also interesting, a different opinion, then feel free to post to the comments section below.

“Art” in QlikView, now in color!

Mona Lisa in QlikView - Oh no the horror, it's only black and white!!!! Save us MicroStrategy!!!!! ;)I came across this post on the MicroStrategy Community tonight. It mentions a few of the Qlik and Tableau visualizations of famous paintings that floated around a few years ago. The images that were used back then, an example shown on the right, were black and white. Robert, the author of the MicroStrategy article, concludes that black and white is boring, and that it would be much better if the pictures were in color.

MicroStrategy to the rescue! Robert writes that as of version 10, you are able to do colored visualizations in MicroStrategy. He then goes on to demonstrate a few visualizations in color! Take that QlikView and Tableau!

Overwhelmed by this spectacle of colors, I was already considering dropping my career in QlikView and moving into MicroStrategy when a thought popped into my head. Could it be that the author was mistaking the limitations of the data set (which only contained black & white values) for limitations of the tools? Perhaps QlikView (and Tableau) could also visualize pictures in color?

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Win a free QlikView course for only a minute of your time (really!)

what-will-you-learn-todayv2_189As you may have read here before, besides blogging at QlikFix I also participate in the Q-On Training Center. Q-On offers focused, online instructor-led trainings that dive deep into specific QlikView and Qlik Sense subjects. These courses are delivered by well-known experts such as Rob Wunderlich, Karl Pover and Ralf Becher.

You can imagine that with attendees and trainers located all around the world, scheduling these courses so that it works out for everyone is sometimes not an easy feat. Besides that we are also developing additional courses.

Great, but you said something about a free QlikView course?

Yes, in order to better tune our courses to meet your schedules and interests, I have prepared a very short survey to ask you about your preferences. This will only take a minute of your time and in return you will be entered into a prize draw for a free Q-On training of your choice. The winner will be announced on July 1st 2015.

Looking forward to your input: take the survey.

RightQlik: a Windows Explorer context menu for QlikView

RightQlik

RightQlik is a small utility written by QlikView 11 for Developers co-author Miguel García. As I love how this utility makes my developer life just a little easier I posted a link today on LinkedIn and Twitter. I was surprised by how many people had never heard of RightQlik. It’s been out for quite a while. In the hope of having a few more people discover this little gem I am putting this post on my blog.

So what does RightQlik do?

RightQlik is a custom context menu (pictured right) that is shown when right-clicking on a QVW file. It allows quick access to common functions that you will often perform on a QlikView document:

  • Open in a new QV instance: open the QlikView document in a new QlikView instance (i.e. “having the program open multiple times”). This lets you easily switch between several QlikView files, or display them side by side (this is what I often use).
  • Open without data: opens the document without also loading its data. Very useful when you quickly need something from a big document, or if the data has become corrupted (fortunately a very rare event).
  • Reload document: reload the QlikView script and close the document after completion. With this option, you can run simultaneous, local reloads of several QlikView documents with a simple click by first selecting all of them.
  • Reload and keep open: reload the QlikView script and keep the document open after completion.

This custom context menu is only shown when dealing with QVW files, so it will stay out of your way when dealing with any other file type.

You can download RightQlik for free from the QlikMarket.

PS. If you find this utility useful, then please consider writing a short review on the QlikMarket.

One Simple Trick That Will Significantly Boost Your QlikView Performance

Edit April 2nd 2015: Yes, of course this is an April Fools joke, hope I made you smile. The Masters Summit is no joke though, and neither is the $300 early bird discount that you will receive until April 15th 2015. Want to really take your skills to the next level? Join us in San Francisco on May 4 – 6, or New York City or Copenhagen later this year.

Amazing Business DiscoveriesToday I am going to let you in on a big secret.

People often ask me how I always get great performance and fast response times out of my QlikView applications. I usually put on a very serious face and reply that this is the result of years of experience. Experience gained by doing hundreds of implementations, practice, experiment, study and continually refining my skills and knowledge.

You won’t believe how hard it is to not burst out laughing when I tell this to people. The fact of the matter is that it is all a gimmick!

There is only one simple trick that you need to know to instantly boost your QlikView performance. This is the secret that Qlik and the Qlik Illuminati don’t want you to know, but today I will reveal it all!

Are you ready for the truth? Here it comes!

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What QlikView developers can learn from The Karate Kid

Karate KidAs you might have guessed from some of my earlier posts, I am a sucker for popular culture from the 80’s and 90’s. On this (apparently) most-depressing day of the year, let me offer you some light hearted, positive reading and share with you five of the motivational lessons that I learned from the 1984 classic The Karate Kid. Specifically, I will tell you how these lessons can be applied to learning QlikView, increasing your skills and expanding your knowledge. Or at least make you smile.

A quick summary of the plot for those not familiar with the movie (shame on you! 😉 ):

Daniel has just moved from New Jersey to California with his mom. He quickly discovers that it isn’t as great as he thought it would be. Daniel doesn’t fit in and a gang of bullies, who are all adept at karate, are making his life miserable. He then meets Mr. Myagi, a handyman who also happens to be a karate master. Mr. Myagi takes Daniel under his wing and teaches him karate, showing him along the way that karate (and life) are not always about power and strenght. Can Daniel overcome his bullies in the All-Valley Karate Championship? (spoiler: yes he can!)

And now, on to the lessons!

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