Category Archives: Functions

Handling multiple languages and translations

Handling multiple languages and translations in QlikViewRecently I made a QlikView application with multiple languages. I came across a blog post by Charles Bannon: “Handling multiple languages”. Charles describes two scenarios for the use of multiple languages. The first scenario, “translate labels and textboxes within the application and not the actual data”, solved my problem. Charles uses a translation table with an index. He uses set analysis to reference the index number and the language. The expression used is:

=Only({<Index={5}>} [$(=vDataLanguage)])

A good solution, but not very user-friendly. Do you know which translation belongs to index 5?

In this blog post I will rewrite the expression to a more user-friendly and readable formula, and will also explore some other ways of dealing with translations in QlikView.

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QlikView functions – a few to spice up your front-end!

Hello all! It’s been a while since my last post, so here I am trying to catch up with you guys again…

In the pastfunctions 2 few months, I came across a couple of functions which I hadn’t used before. Discussing these with Barry, he mentioned that Rob Wunderlich has done a Survey among QlikView Developers and created a list with functions and the frequency of them being used. Looking at that list, I will try to clarify what some of the functions do in a clear and easy example. Also, I will – hopefully together with you – try to figure out why the hack they’re positioned that low!

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Adding annotations to charts

Annotations in QlikView charts

I am currently at the Masters Summit for QlikView in San Francisco attending Bill Lay‘s session on QlikView data visualization. Besides hilarious delivery, Bill is showing some pretty cool visualization examples and tricks.

One thing Bill was showing are various ways you can add annotations to charts, putting them either on the axis or in the legend. One additional view that Bill and I discussed earlier is to put the annotations on the data point. Bill just asked me if there was a blog post about it. There wasn’t, but there is now. Not as polished as usual, but you’ll get the gist by looking at the QVW attached below.

Download the annotated chart example

Online training: QlikView Set Analysis

QlikView Set Analysis Training

Just a quick heads-up about a new online training that Miguel García and I are offering: Set Analysis. We delivered our first training on May 2nd and received excellent ratings and feedback. We are now scheduling new sessions, the first one being held May 23rd 2014. This is a live, instructor-led, 4 hour online training. We have multiple sessions (both in English and Spanish), so you should be able to find one that fits your time zone. More information can be found on the website, or after the break.

Register Now for the Online Set Analysis Training

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Masters Summit for QlikView: European Edition

Masters Summit for QlikViewAfter the success of the Las Vegas edition last April, I’m excited to be once again presenting alongside Rob Wunderlich, Bill Lay and Oleg Troyansky at the European edition of the Masters Summit for QlikView.

Masters Summit for QlikView; London and BarcelonaComing to London from October 9  to 11 and to Barcelona from 14 to 16 October, the Masters Summit brings you 3 days of hands on sessions where we will discuss advanced techniques in building complex solutions with QlikView. The goal of this event is to take your QlikView skills to the next level and help you become a QlikView  master.

For the early birds, there is an attractive discount of US$ 300 (around 225 Euro’s) until August 16th, which, for example, should be enough to cover air fare from most locations within Europe. Make sure you do not miss out on this great offer and:

Register for the Masters Summit for QlikView

I hope to see you all there!

Announcing QlikView 11 for Developers: The Book

QlikView 11 for Developers book coverAfter many months of hard work, today I am proud and excited to announce the upcoming release of the new QlikView book that Mike García and I wrote together:

QlikView 11 for Developers

With 500 pages of original content and an extensive collection of code samples, we believe this book contains everything new (and seasoned) QlikView developers should know in order to put QlikView 11 to productive use.

The book will be published by Packt Publishing and is scheduled for release on November 15th. If you want to secure a copy for yourself, pre-orders can be placed via this page.

Of course, writing a book is not a solo (or in our case, duo) exercise. Mike and I could not have done it without the great contributions of:

Donald Farmer Foreword Blog @donalddotfarmer
Ralf Becher Technical review Blog @TIQView
Steve Dark Technical review Blog @quintelligence
Stephen Redmond Technical review Blog @stephencredmond
John Trigg Code support @qt_trigjoh
Rashmi Phadnis Acquisition editor @rashp
Joanne Fitzpatrick Acquisition editor
Sai Gamare Project coordinator @saigamare
Anugya Khurana Project coordinator
Ankita Shashi Lead Technical editor
Nitee Shetty Technical editor

In the coming weeks, we will be giving you insights into the book and will also be giving away a few copies, so be sure to watch this space. You can get notified of new posts by entering your email address in the input box in the top right corner of this page.

Update 2012/11/20: yesterday we were informed by the publisher that both the print version and the e-book will be released on November 23rd.

Update 2012/11/23: the book is now available for sale! (Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Packt)

Update 2012/11/29: for those that are unable to download the code bundle from the publisher’s website, you can also download it from this link: http://bit.ly/CodeBundle

Visual FX in QlikView (2)

After the many enthusiastic responses to last week’s post on visual effects in QlikView, I’ve decided to post one more pretty-but-pointless animated chart before returning to the serious stuff. This time I’ve created a plasma effect using an animated scatter plot in QlikView. The video below demonstrates the application.


If you want to try out the application yourself, you can download the full application below.

Download the QlikView Animated Plasma app

That’s it for this time. The next post will have practical use again, I promise 😉

Visual FX in QlikView

Today’s post comes to you straight from the Department of Useless-But-Fun Stuff.

Many people have seen Hans Rosling’s informative (and very entertaining) presentations in which he uses his Gapminder software to present data in animated scatter plots. With the Animate Dimension function, QlikView offers similar functionality to create animated charts.

Unfortunately, as many have discovered, animating charts in QlikView does not immediately make them informative or entertaining. In fact, the opposite is quite often the case; boring data is presented in an animated form and becomes even more tedious.

Curious to see if I could create an animated chart that, while maybe not informative, at least looks pretty, I decided to create a chart based on Lissajous curves. You can see the result, which uses a standard scatter plot, in the video below. The video contains cheesy music, so check the volume level before pressing play.


Of course, this chart lacks any practical application, but I find that it does look quite cool. Incidentally, this is also the only case  in which the use of shiny spheres in a scatter plot is permissible. Should you want to play around with the app, it can be downloaded below.

Download the QlikView Animated Lissajous Curve app

QlikView blog round-up: If-statements, inline tables & EDX

DecisionsTime to dust off a posting category that hasn’t been getting as much love as it should have; the QlikView blog round-up. Today I have for you three blog posts that I read recently and found very interesting:

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Creating a custom sort order: load order & dual

Dual or Duel? Couldn't find a fitting picture to visualize the concept of sorting, so I decided to make a lame joke instead ;) Excellent movie though, really had me on the edge of my seat the entire time.In a previous post I described how to create a custom sort order in QlikView by assigning a sort order value in the load script or by using the match function. This post describes two other clever methods that I recently became aware of:

Read on to see how these methods work.

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