Author Archives: Bitmetric Admin

Bitmetric Admin

Bitmetric Admin

Blog posts from the Bitmetric team. At Bitmetric, Qlik is what we do. We've been doing it for years, and we can do it for you! ;)

What I learned about Qlik Sense security

It's like a big wall, but for Qlik Sense, and it actually makes sense.When comparing Qlik Sense to QlikView, the most obvious differences are on the front-end, with its completely overhauled and fully responsive design. Other major differences are the server-based development, the use of Master Items and the shift towards APIs, mashups, extensions and widgets.

Somewhat less prominent, though very deserving of your attention, is the security model in Qlik Sense. This has a completely new approach compared to QlikView, and you can pretty much create endless variations. Rather than hacking stuff together and hoping it works, my colleague Rik and I recently decided to take a more structured approach and do some R&D on Sense security rules. Our goal was to gain more understanding of security in Sense, develop methods for gathering and modeling security requirements and to design reference patterns for common implementation scenarios.

We will be sharing some of the methods and patterns that we came up with in an upcoming white paper. In the mean time, I’d like to share with you some of the little interesting, strange and otherwise noteworthy things that we found. These range from basic to slightly obscure, but all should hopefully help you get more understanding of Qlik Sense security rules. Let’s start with noting that the approach in Sense is totally different than it was in QlikView…

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Handling multiple languages and translations

Handling multiple languages and translations in QlikViewRecently I made a QlikView application with multiple languages. I came across a blog post by Charles Bannon: “Handling multiple languages”. Charles describes two scenarios for the use of multiple languages. The first scenario, “translate labels and textboxes within the application and not the actual data”, solved my problem. Charles uses a translation table with an index. He uses set analysis to reference the index number and the language. The expression used is:

=Only({<Index={5}>} [$(=vDataLanguage)])

A good solution, but not very user-friendly. Do you know which translation belongs to index 5?

In this blog post I will rewrite the expression to a more user-friendly and readable formula, and will also explore some other ways of dealing with translations in QlikView.

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Geographical analysis with QlikMaps

QlikMaps

There are multiple mapping extensions available for geographical visualization and analysis in QlikView and Qlik Sense. Examples of commercial offerings are GeoQlik, NPGeoMap, Idevio and QlikMaps. Bitmetric (the people behind this blog 😉 ) is a QlikMaps partner, so I have been working a lot with QlikMaps recently. I have found it very powerful yet easy to work with.

QlikMaps demo

Today I want to share with you a small demo that I built. This demo shows demographic information about London mixed with a few of my holiday snapshots. The demo shows most of the common features of QlikMaps.

Want to try QlikMaps?

QlikMaps is available for both QlikView and Qlik Sense. Want to get a free trial and try it out with your own data? Then send us a request using the form below and we’ll get you hooked up!

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QlikView functions – a few to spice up your front-end!

Hello all! It’s been a while since my last post, so here I am trying to catch up with you guys again…

In the pastfunctions 2 few months, I came across a couple of functions which I hadn’t used before. Discussing these with Barry, he mentioned that Rob Wunderlich has done a Survey among QlikView Developers and created a list with functions and the frequency of them being used. Looking at that list, I will try to clarify what some of the functions do in a clear and easy example. Also, I will – hopefully together with you – try to figure out why the hack they’re positioned that low!

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Target lines on a bar chart using error bars

During my internship at Bitmetric one of my project goals was to build a QlikView application to benchmark logistical companies. I needed to visually compare the results of one organization with the average results of all organizations. My first try was using a combo chart with symbols, but I wasn’t happy with how that looked:

Error bars ComboChart

The dot seems to reflect an interval instead of a value. What I really wanted was to make is a chart that uses a straight line for the benchmark:

Individual target lines on a QlikView bar chartIn this blog I will show you how you can make such a chart.

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Introduction to alternate states

QlikView Alternate StatesA little while ago, I was asked to change an existing QlikView Application. While scanning the application, I found that it used Alternate States. I had already heard about Alternate States, and that they could store different user selections, but didn’t have any hands-on experience yet. I decided to dig a bit deeper into the subject before continuing. I wrote down what I learned in this post

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Linked bar charts

Two questions from business users that will probably sound familiar to most QlikView Developers:

“We currently use this report. Can you re-make this in QlikView?”

and

“Our graphics designer came up with this dashboard. Can you do that in QlikView?”

Quite often you’ll find the answer to be yes. Although admittedly, you often may also want to suggest another approach, especially when asked the first question.

Recently I was asked if the following chart could be built in QlikView:

Linked Bar Chart - The Challenge

As you can see, this chart compares relative-to-total amounts for two periods. There is a vague area that connects both bars and kind-of-but-not-so-much shows the change between the periods. I had to think a bit harder before responding to that question…

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