Join me in the Qlik Sense Cloud

Qlik Sense CloudWant to build a quick dashboard or analyze some data? Want to share your findings with others or publish charts on social media? Then the Qlik Sense Cloud might be of interest to you. This cloud version of Qlik Sense has been available since September 2014. While it is still in beta, features are steadily being added. Best of all, it is completely free!

You can upload up to 250MB of your own data, but can also get external data from the Qlik DataMarket (for example information on exchange rates, demographics, weather or businesses) to augment your internal data.


A use case

The missus and I are expecting a baby early next year. Picking a name, in my opinion, is no easy task. I don’t want my kid to have the same name as 5 other kids in his class, but also not a really obscure name (like “Bamboo”, “Patient”, “Berlusconi” or “Zorro”, names that were actually given to some unfortunate kids in the Netherlands in 2014). To make things a little easier, I downloaded a list of all the baby names that were given in the Netherlands in 2014, loaded it into a Sense Cloud App and shared it with my wife. Now we can easily filter names based on popularity, length, letters, etc. and see what we like. It’s nothing too fancy, but the fact that we can use it from a tablet or our phone without having to install anything makes it a lot more convenient and fun.

Want to try the Qlik Sense Cloud?

If you would like to give the Qlik Sense Cloud a try, then enter your email address in the form below. You will then automatically receive an invite for my shared space on the Qlik Cloud. This will give you access to any applications that I publish to the Qlik Cloud and will also give you the option to create your own applications. (email addresses are only used to send the invites and are not stored)

Up to 50% discount on “QlikView 11 for Developers” this November

QlikView 11 for DevelopersThe good folks over at Packt Publishing are having a special promotion on our book QlikView 11 for Developers until November 25th 2015. Now is an excellent time to get the book if you:

  • Do not yet own the book (but want to!), or
  • ‘Borrowed’ a copy from the Internet before and want to regain some good karma, or
  • Are delivering our QlikView classroom training and want to replenish your stock, or
  • Want to give a gift to that special QlikView Developer in your life, or
  • Own the original version before it gets replaced by QlikView 12 for Developers (that might take a while), or
  • Have an exceptionally wobbly table that requires fixing.

If any of the reasons above apply to you, or if you have another good reason (would love to hear them, please comment 😉 ), then feel free to use the following discount codes:

Discount code
Discount Book version
QLIKVIEW50 50% eBook – English version
QLIKVIEW20 20% print book – English version
QLIK50ESP 50% eBook – Spanish version
QLIK20ESP 20% print book – Spanish version


Remote include scripts

Got a bunch of scripts here for you, where do you want me to put them?One of the reasons why I like QlikView so much is that there are always new functions and applications to discover. Yesterday I was at a client who is a Qlik OEM partner. During lunch we discussed various uses of include scripts. The question came up if it was possible to remotely update include scripts. At the same time they didn’t want these external scripts to be viewable (they sell a solution based on QlikView, clients get the solution but the OEM owns the code). Of course, that makes things a little more complicated. The include script sits outside of QlikView in plain text, so anyone can read it. Besides that, updating an external script that sits on the client’s local server is also not a straightforward affair.

I started wondering if it might be possible to fetch an include script from a remote website. So I just tried it, and it works!* (in QlikView, Sense requires Legacy Mode to be enabled, I will let you decide if that is a good idea)

Try this one for example:


In my opinion, this opens up some interesting use cases:

read more »

QlikView macro’s are bad!

Last Thursday I did a presentation at the Qlik Dev Group NL about QlikView macro’s. While the title Macro’s are bad! suggests that I have a very firm view on macro’s, of course the actual presentation is much more nuanced. I wouldn’t be talking about macro’s if I didn’t think they have their uses 😉

In my presentation, I identify some potential use cases for macro’s and discuss if these are a good idea. Next, I share some tips on developing and debugging your macro’s. There are a lot of myths around macro’s, so I have taken a look at which ones are actually true. The presentation concludes with an overview of some of the cool macro’s that are already out there.

You can find my slide deck below:

The examples that I used in my presentation can be downloaded using the link below:

Download the macro examples

I hope you will enjoy these slides. If you have any questions or, also interesting, a different opinion, then feel free to post to the comments section below.

Qlik Dev Group NL on October 29th 2015

Qlik Dev GroupAre you interested in exchanging ideas and knowledge about QlikView and Sense with your peers? Then the Qlik Dev Group might be for you!

The Qlik Dev Group is a regular gathering where Qlik professionals can socialize, share ideas, challenges and solutions and generally have real discussions, devoid of any sales and marketing bias. Attendance is free, and yes, there is food and drinks!

These events are community-driven and independent from Qlik or any partners. The Qlik Dev Group originated in the UK, but as with most good ideas the concept is quickly spreading to other locations. Events have already been held in Denmark and The Netherlands and events in Finland, Germany and France are underway.

Qlik Dev Group NL meetup

On Thursday October 29th 2015, the Dutch chapter of the Qlik Dev Group is organizing a meetup in Hoofddorp (near Amsterdam). We have some very interesting speakers this time:

  • Henric Cronström of Qlik will give us an ‘under the hood’ insight into QlikView and Sense.
  • Jason Atkinson of Rituals Cosmetics will explain how they realized their ‘mobile first’ strategy and made QlikView available to all their stores and all their mobile devices.

Additional presentations will be announced later, but we can promise they will be interesting as well!

If you’re in the area, feel free to sign up on the website. Hope to see many of you there!

QlikView functions – a few to spice up your front-end!

Hello all! It’s been a while since my last post, so here I am trying to catch up with you guys again…

In the pastfunctions 2 few months, I came across a couple of functions which I hadn’t used before. Discussing these with Barry, he mentioned that Rob Wunderlich has done a Survey among QlikView Developers and created a list with functions and the frequency of them being used. Looking at that list, I will try to clarify what some of the functions do in a clear and easy example. Also, I will – hopefully together with you – try to figure out why the hack they’re positioned that low!

read more »

Have QlikView – Will Travel. Where do Masters Summit attendees come from?

Advanced QlikView Training: theMasters Summit for QlikViewIf you are a regular reader of this blog, you are probably aware of the Masters Summit for QlikView. Besides offering some of the best advanced QlikView training available on the market, this 3 day event adds a unique “conference feel” where you are able to network and exchange ideas with peers from all around the world.

My colleague Frédérique recently put together some visualizations to answer some questions we had about our attendees; where do our attendees come from? How far do they travel? What kind of companies do they work for? Do they and their companies experience enough value to return?

As I thought you might enjoy these visualizations as well I have posted them to the blog. If you want to hear more about our attendees’ experiencing, be sure to also check out the testimonials page over on the Masters Summit website.

read more »

“Art” in QlikView, now in color!

Mona Lisa in QlikView - Oh no the horror, it's only black and white!!!! Save us MicroStrategy!!!!! ;)I came across this post on the MicroStrategy Community tonight. It mentions a few of the Qlik and Tableau visualizations of famous paintings that floated around a few years ago. The images that were used back then, an example shown on the right, were black and white. Robert, the author of the MicroStrategy article, concludes that black and white is boring, and that it would be much better if the pictures were in color.

MicroStrategy to the rescue! Robert writes that as of version 10, you are able to do colored visualizations in MicroStrategy. He then goes on to demonstrate a few visualizations in color! Take that QlikView and Tableau!

Overwhelmed by this spectacle of colors, I was already considering dropping my career in QlikView and moving into MicroStrategy when a thought popped into my head. Could it be that the author was mistaking the limitations of the data set (which only contained black & white values) for limitations of the tools? Perhaps QlikView (and Tableau) could also visualize pictures in color?

read more »

Win a free QlikView course for only a minute of your time (really!)

what-will-you-learn-todayv2_189As you may have read here before, besides blogging at QlikFix I also participate in the Q-On Training Center. Q-On offers focused, online instructor-led trainings that dive deep into specific QlikView and Qlik Sense subjects. These courses are delivered by well-known experts such as Rob Wunderlich, Karl Pover and Ralf Becher.

You can imagine that with attendees and trainers located all around the world, scheduling these courses so that it works out for everyone is sometimes not an easy feat. Besides that we are also developing additional courses.

Great, but you said something about a free QlikView course?

Yes, in order to better tune our courses to meet your schedules and interests, I have prepared a very short survey to ask you about your preferences. This will only take a minute of your time and in return you will be entered into a prize draw for a free Q-On training of your choice. The winner will be announced on July 1st 2015.

Looking forward to your input: take the survey.

RightQlik: a Windows Explorer context menu for QlikView


RightQlik is a small utility written by QlikView 11 for Developers co-author Miguel García. As I love how this utility makes my developer life just a little easier I posted a link today on LinkedIn and Twitter. I was surprised by how many people had never heard of RightQlik. It’s been out for quite a while. In the hope of having a few more people discover this little gem I am putting this post on my blog.

So what does RightQlik do?

RightQlik is a custom context menu (pictured right) that is shown when right-clicking on a QVW file. It allows quick access to common functions that you will often perform on a QlikView document:

  • Open in a new QV instance: open the QlikView document in a new QlikView instance (i.e. “having the program open multiple times”). This lets you easily switch between several QlikView files, or display them side by side (this is what I often use).
  • Open without data: opens the document without also loading its data. Very useful when you quickly need something from a big document, or if the data has become corrupted (fortunately a very rare event).
  • Reload document: reload the QlikView script and close the document after completion. With this option, you can run simultaneous, local reloads of several QlikView documents with a simple click by first selecting all of them.
  • Reload and keep open: reload the QlikView script and keep the document open after completion.

This custom context menu is only shown when dealing with QVW files, so it will stay out of your way when dealing with any other file type.

You can download RightQlik for free from the QlikMarket.

PS. If you find this utility useful, then please consider writing a short review on the QlikMarket.