Target lines on a bar chart using error bars

During my internship at Bitmetric one of my project goals was to build a QlikView application to benchmark logistical companies. I needed to visually compare the results of one organization with the average results of all organizations. My first try was using a combo chart with symbols, but I wasn’t happy with how that looked:

Error bars ComboChart

The dot seems to reflect an interval instead of a value. What I really wanted was to make is a chart that uses a straight line for the benchmark:

Individual target lines on a QlikView bar chartIn this blog I will show you how you can make such a chart.

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What QlikView developers can learn from The Karate Kid

Karate KidAs you might have guessed from some of my earlier posts, I am a sucker for popular culture from the 80’s and 90’s. On this (apparently) most-depressing day of the year, let me offer you some light hearted, positive reading and share with you five of the motivational lessons that I learned from the 1984 classic The Karate Kid. Specifically, I will tell you how these lessons can be applied to learning QlikView, increasing your skills and expanding your knowledge. Or at least make you smile.

A quick summary of the plot for those not familiar with the movie (shame on you! ;-) ):

Daniel has just moved from New Jersey to California with his mom. He quickly discovers that it isn’t as great as he thought it would be. Daniel doesn’t fit in and a gang of bullies, who are all adept at karate, are making his life miserable. He then meets Mr. Myagi, a handyman who also happens to be a karate master. Mr. Myagi takes Daniel under his wing and teaches him karate, showing him along the way that karate (and life) are not always about power and strenght. Can Daniel overcome his bullies in the All-Valley Karate Championship? (spoiler: yes he can!)

And now, on to the lessons!

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Online QlikView trainings in January 2015

As you may know, we offer online QlikView and Qlik Sense trainings through the QlikOn Training Center. These trainings are short (4 hours max), instructor-led and focus on a single subject which will be covered in-depth. With small groups there is enough opportunity to ask as many questions as you like. A perfect way to increase your skills and knowledge.

For January 2015, we are offer the following trainings:

4ac7eff2-df02-466d-ba70-58a779a6d3e6Introduction to QlikView Extensions
Date: Thursday January 15th
Duration: 2.5 hours (2 sessions)
Trainer: Ralf Becher

 

b8183d29-3f2f-4f7c-a7c4-995e2c6f5d9cQlikView Components Scripting Library

Date: Thursday January 29th
Duration: 3.5 hours (1 session)
Trainer: Rob Wunderlich

 

0b72d2c1-a3d8-4183-8d85-d2442814940aQlikView Data Visualization (new)

Date: Friday January 30th
Duration: 4 hours (1 session)
Trainer: Karl Pover

 

95eb1483-6067-47f7-9ef5-27d358ca7af2Set Analysis

Date: Thursday January 22nd
Duration: 4 hours (2 sessions)
Trainer: Barry Harmsen

 

For more information check out the QlikOn website. Are you in need of a specific training, or do you have an interesting QlikView / Qlik Sense training that you would like to deliver? Feel free to contact me to discuss.

Visual FX in QlikView (5): Merry Xmas 2014!

Christmas time is near again, so it’s time for another visual effect in QlikView: the QlikFix 2014 Christmas Card. Using the trusty animated scatter plot once more, I’ve built a little spinning Christmas tree (and, in the spirit of Christmas, added some awful music ;) ). Check the video below:

The complete QVW can be downloaded below:

Download the 2014 QlikFix Christmas Card

Wishing you all happy holidays and all the best for 2015!

More visual FX in QlikView:

 

New feature: QlikView / Qlik Sense book list

Books for QlikView and Qlik Sense developers and consultantsDifferent people have different preferences for acquiring new skills and knowledge. Some like to follow a classroom training while others prefer to start with a concrete problem, research the subject themselves and learn by doing. Some people like to read blog posts and watch videos, while others prefer to read a book. Today I have something for that last group; a reading list for QlikView and Qlik Sense professionals.

The reading list is available through this link, or via the top menu bar. It does not only contain books about QlikView or Qlik Sense, but also a range of peripheral methods, skills and technologies that I believe will make you a more well-rounded Qlik professional. I will be periodically updating this list with new and relevant books.

I hope you will enjoy this list. If there are any must-read books that you are missing, feel free to contact me through the contact form, or leave me a comment below.

Remove scrolling tabs from QlikView Chart Properties

Remove scrolling tabs from QlikView Chart Properties

A short post today, but one that will fix a very common developer annoyance in QlikView 11 and 11.2; the scroll tabs in the chart properties dialog window. When you want to change properties on tabs that are on opposing sides of the tab row (for example, Dimensions and then Layout) you first have to click the scroll arrows before you can select the tab. Extremely annoying, if you ask me.

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Introduction to alternate states

QlikView Alternate StatesA little while ago, I was asked to change an existing QlikView Application. While scanning the application, I found that it used Alternate States. I had already heard about Alternate States, and that they could store different user selections, but didn’t have any hands-on experience yet. I decided to dig a bit deeper into the subject before continuing. I wrote down what I learned in this post

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Masters Summit early-bird offer ends this week

Masters Summit for QlikView - Amsterdam

A quick heads-up for those of you who are planning to attend the upcoming Masters Summit for QlikView in Amsterdam, the early-bird offer ends this Friday, August 15th. Don’t miss out on a $300 discount!

For more information about the event, or to register, please go to the Masters Summit for QlikView website. I hope to meet many of you there!

Building a nicer (dynamic) multibox, without extensions

Building a nicer, dynamic multibox in QlikViewThe multibox is a QlikView object that I find extremely useful because it allows you to fit selection fields into a much smaller space. At the same time, I also find it extremely annoying; the gradient looks dated and if you want your field names and values to be readable you will often have to make both columns quite wide. For these reasons I tend to not use the multibox in my applications, using a conditionally hidden drop-down filter panel instead.

Recently, I was hired to perform a health check on an application. The application made extensive use of a multibox (in a very nice and flexible way, I should add). One of the challenges my client was facing was that not every field was relevant to every user. Besides a general technical review of the application, the developers wanted to know if it was possible to create a dynamic multibox. A multibox where users could select which fields they want to show.

As I started digging in to this question, I realized there’s a much nicer way to create a multibox. After experimenting with it for a bit, I actually like this solution so much that I will probably be using it in some of my future projects.

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Aliases, to indent or not?

“Code is read more often than it is written”

  – common programming adage

As someone who often has to look at/modify QlikView script written by others, I have come to appreciate the value of readable script. Rather than taking an “if it works, it works” attitude, I always try to write my script with readability and consistency in mind. Somewhere down the line someone else (or worse, you) might have to decipher what a specific script is doing in order to modify or extend it.

Today I want to ask your opinion on the readability of a specific part of the QlikView script, indentation of aliases within LOAD statements. To this end, I’ve taken a piece of script from the QlikView System Monitor and formatted the aliases in three different ways. (note: I don’t agree with the absence of white space in functions and between operators, but have left that as is)

Have a look at the three options, and then please answer the two multiple choice questions below.

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